Self Balancing Boards/Scooter Trends in December

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Opinions on self-balancing scooter riders on campus

Student riding on hoverboard. Photo by Nolan Bollier
Jennifer Walter, Science & Technology Reporter
November 30th, 2015
Marquette students are taking a cue?from Tupac Shakur’s “Picture Me Rolling” ?as they cruise around campus on their self-balancing scooters.
It isn’t uncommon to walk to class and share the sidewalk with someone riding on their “self-balancing scooter” or “Segway without handlebars.”
Self-balancing scooters?can be bought online from sites like eBay or Amazon and cost?$250 and up.
Jake Nikolay, a freshman in the College of Communication, saw many basketball players riding around on self-balancing scooters?and decided to buy one.
“I get a lot of people asking to ride it,” Nikolay said. “Most people are pretty cool with it.”
Nikolay finds himself using his self-balancing scooter nearly every day.
“It saves a lot of time, usually,” he said. “It’s faster than walking.”
Although self-balancing scooters?fascinate some, others are skeptical of their practicality and necessity.
“They look cool, but I think they’re pretty pointless,” said Annah Horst, a freshman in the College of Communication. “I especially get irritated when I see basketball players and athletes using them. Sometimes I’ve seen them inside, which I don’t understand.”
Bibin Augustine, a freshman in the College of Health Sciences, finds self-balancing scooters?to be cool, but would never personally want to own one.
“I wouldn’t bring it to campus with me everywhere because sometimes they’re practical, but sometimes they’re not,” Augustine said. “You can pretty much just out-walk them.”
Because this new mode of transportation is still gaining popularity, no laws for self-balancing scooter usage exist.
In the eyes of the law, self-balancing scooters?are most closely related to Segways. They are motorized vehicles that often share the sidewalk with pedestrians.
“Motorists tend to react to the speed of pedestrians, so if you’re moving in a pedestrian kind of walkway, then you could potentially put yourself at risk with pedestrians,” Marquette Police Department Chief Paul Mascari said.
Mascari has not witnessed any major incidents involving self-balancing scooters. He said no one has requested that the university regulate the usage of self-balancing scooters?on campus.
The issues that have arisen have been mainly off campus and involve theft.
“We have seen elsewhere in the city that self-balancing scooters?have become a target for criminals,” Mascari said.
Mascari advises self-balancing scooter users to make sure they are aware of their surroundings and to use their devices in well-lit and well-populated areas.
“It takes people a while to catch up whenever there’s a new mode of transportation out there,” Mascari said.

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Where did all these weird hoverboard balancing scooter thingies come from?
Those bowtie-shaped “motorized self-balancing two-wheeled scooters” you see in the windows of strip-mall cellphone repair shops and in mall-kiosks roared out of nowhere and are now everywhere, despite being so new that we don’t even know what they’re called.
This week’s Planet Money (MP3) travels to Shenzhen, China, “the world’s factory,” and tries to figure out where this all started. As near as they can tell, a Chinese engineer in the USA successfully kickstarted a self-balancing board, the videos were seen by engineers in China, who figured out a much cheaper way to make a similar board (they use a clever system of linkages between motors instead of accelerometers and gyroscopes) using commodity parts, and factories started to tool up to make the boards, selling them through Alibaba and importer/exporters.
Buzzfeed’s Joseph Bernstein?also travelled to Shenzhen?and spoke with many of the people in the hoverboard supply-chain: small factory owners, sales reps, workers, and exporter/distributors from around the world who’re trying to figure out which of the identical-seeming gizmos to send abroad.
Bernstein is interested in this phenomenon as “memeufacturing” — a couple of social-media stars (or garden-variety celebs) post viral videos of themselves using an obscure gadget, and halfway around the world, factories shut down their e-cig lines and convert them, almost overnight, to hoverboard manufacturing lines. Bernstein cites a source who says that there are?1,000 hoverboard factories?in South China — and another one, Chic Smart, outside of Shanghai, that’s threatening to sue all the rest for patent infringement (good luck with that).
The speed at which the retooling took place is baffling. South China’s factories have the nimbleness born of precarity (retool or die!) but even by those standards, 1,000 factories is an incredible number:?two factories a day?since the first (?) hoverboard shipped.
As amazing as that manufacturing story is, I think the weirdness of the product itself is even more amazing. I remember visiting China in 2007 and seeing a million bizarre variants on Ipods, which were the hot category at the time. That story was easy to understand: Apple spent a fortune opening a market for music players of a certain size and shape. China’s entrepreneurs, living in a bubble where Apple’s patents and trademarks were largely unenforceable, set to copying that design, and (this is the important part)?varying?it. Trying out combinations that were weird and unlikely (and almost entirely doomed). In the absence of a control-freak company with the power of the state behind it, variation flourished, a mini-Galapagos of Ipod-ish gadgets in every color and shape.
But hoverboards are different: they are knockoffs without an original. The copies of the “original” hoverboard (if anyone can ever agree on what that was) created the market, and they were?already?varied and mutated. There was never a moment at which all the bus-shelters and billboards touted an ideal, original hoverboard that the bottom-feeders started to nibble away at. The pre-mutated hoverboards arrived without a name (they still don’t have a name — I’m calling them hoverboards, but there are lots of other things that their riders call them). They arrived without an original shape, aspect ratio, size, charge-time, or color scheme.
They’re part of a new category of hyperspeed gadgets — like ecigs and LED lightbulbs — that have no authoritative version. Products that start life as commodities.
A fun science fiction exercise is to imagine things that are hard and formalized and regulated being replaced with things that are fluid and bottom up. Imagine what a car would look like if it were made this way. Imagine prefab buildings.
Cranes.
Airplanes.

It’s a funny old, new, world. However, please rest assured that F-wheel is an old qualified manufacturer for its years of rich manufacturing experience in self balancing board field since 2012. F-wheel Insures Production Pass Rate Up to 98%.

Certificates of F-wheel

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In October, nearly 4,000 exhibitors gathered at a 1 million-square-foot convention center jutting into Hong Kong’s Victoria Harbor. They were here to meet some of the people looking to buy and resell fung fo leon, hoverboards, self-balancing two-wheel scooters, power balance boards, whatever you wanted to call them. As long as you were interested in buying them, it didn’t matter. As long as you were interested in buying something.
On the ground floor of the convention center, a 22-year-old named Natalie Cheung stood handing out fliers, a hoverboard idling next to her feet; she told me she was getting paid 45 Hong Kong dollars (about $5.80 USD) per day to point people in the direction of “featured products,” which included heart-rate-sensing earbuds, a drone the size of a small flapjack, and a “2-wheel Electric Scooter” with “ultra endurance” and “refined aesthetic.” On floor after floor, cavernous halls housed thousands of identical metal and plastic booths, each one representing a factory, most of them on the Chinese mainland. Together, they offered everything imaginable that can be plugged in, from televisions and tablets to alarm systems and electronic toothbrushes; hair dryers and flashlights to megaphones and industrial relays; UV disinfectors and toasters to underwater cameras and digital Bible readers.
Though the fair was a huge production, it is probably more useful to think of it not as one discrete event, but as a single destination in a rolling regional spectacular. A week after the Hong Kong show, many of the exhibitors would pack up and head to Canton Fair in Guanzhou, an extravaganza so intense the powers that be divided it into six separate “phases.” After that, they’d move on again: Chinaexhibition.com lists 25 electronics fairs in China and Hong Kong between now and September 2016.
If this sounds at all familiar, it’s probably because the UK?made a similar declaration last month, when it explained that these scooters are technically motor vehicles and must adhere to proper traffic laws. They don’t.

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On Monday, the?NYPD’s 26th Precinct twitter account tweeted out the following message: “Be advised that the electric hoverboard is illegal as per?NYC Admin. Code 19-176.2.” The tweet itself was soon deleted, but not before the?Gothamist?took a screenshot of it.

Existing tweet or not,?Code 19-176.2?doesn’t specifically mention self-balancing scooters. Instead, it makes it clear that the term “motorized scooter” means “any wheeled device that has handlebars,” but doesn’t mean electric powered devices that can’t exceed fifteen miles per hour. Most self-balancing scooters don’t, meaning they’re free to be used in public, right? Wrong.
The NYC Department of Transportation confirmed to the Gothamist that electric scooters are definitely illegal. They’re considered to be motorized vehicles that can’t be registered with the DMV, making them?illegal under NY state law. As such, anyone caught riding one of these will be hit with a $500 fine.
It’s currently unclear if electric skateboards are also illegal in New York, but we don’t recommend riding one to find out. Maybe the state will loosen up in the future and follow California’s decision to?reverse the ban on them.

The F-wheel Self-Balancing Two-Wheel Electric Scooter Launches on Facebook
You’ve been seeing them pop up all over the place, they’ve piqued your curiosity, and, let’s be honest here, you’ve considered how you can talk yourself into buying one. Self-balancing, electric scooters are the Razr scooters for today’s generation of kids young and old. They’re a hot, futuristic-kind-of item that burst onto the scene seemingly out of the middle of nowhere.
And today, a new entrant into the market was announced. The F-wheel is a two-wheel electric self-balancing scooter that launched on Facebook with the goal of raising $10,000 in 30 days. (As of late Tuesday morning, with the project just a few hours old, it had raised 6 percent of its goal.)
The inventors of the F-wheel describe the product as a cross between a scooter and a skateboard and said it is a “perfect gift” for the 15 to 50-year-old high-tech enthusiast. The F-wheel is designed to self-balance, responding to how the user is leaning. The rider simply steps on, leans forward, and goes. The F-wheel has a max speed of about seven miles-per-hour.
Other unique features the inventors touted include Bluetooth speakers that let riders listen to music whilst crusin’, a 10 mile battery life, short two-hour charging time, and a carrying tote for easy transportation. Plus, you’ll be helping the environment by not emitting harmful chemicals into the air, the inventors said.
“When we saw how quickly all of our friends mastered it and how much fun people were having, we knew we wanted to bring the F-wheel to market to share it with the world,” Brian and Karly Leyde, founders of the F-wheel, said in a statement.
According to the Leydes, mastery takes about 10 to 20 minutes. And more than being a snazzy toy, the F-wheel is convenient for college students traveling from their dorm to class, business commuters who have a last-mile walk to and from the office, and employees who work at large-campus offices.

New South Wales Is Another State Where Self-Balancing Scooters Are Banned
As you may have heard,?the United Kingdom is not excited?about that Segway-without-a-stick lookalike self-balancing scooter that celebrities pose with nowadays. It’s not because they like to take gizmo lovers’ toys away, it’s just a matter of traffic safety. In the light of Christmas shopping, Australia’s New South Wales’ officials have recently reminded their citizens they also don’t allow them on the street.?

Before Australians say it, Minister of Roads Duncan Gay?settled it:?“I don’t want to be the Christmas Grinch, but I want people to know and send a message that these new toys have real safety concerns.”?

The Road Transport Act says hoverboards can’t be registered on NSW roads, and riding one on the street implies the risk of a AUS$637 ($461 at the current exchange rate) fine. And they’re banned not just on the streets, since using one on sidewalks will set you back AUS$319 ($231 at the current exchange rate) in fines.?

The news may upset some buyers considering some of these self-balancing scooters are being ordered with as much as a month in advance, especially if one buys it straight from China – where most of these “contraptions” are manufactured. However, riding the boards can be dangerous for the ones using them as well as for those legally using the street and the sidewalk.?

Gay has said that even though they are motorized and can reach speeds of up to 26 kilometers/hour (16 miles/hour), they require no training to use. They also don’t have adequate brakes and don’t have lights or warning indicators, which makes the people riding the scooters unable to interact safely with other road users, like pedestrians.?

As to any solutions, he adds, “Our road safety experts in the Centre for Road Safety are currently working with their counterparts across the country on national laws and safety standards for these personal electric transport devices, so we can figure out how and where people can use them safely.”

HOVERBOARDS/SELF-BALANCING SCOOTERS ARE ILLEGAL IN NYC
BY KYREE LEARY New York City has decided that ‘hoverboards,’ aka self-balancing skateboards, are illegal.
If this sounds at all familiar, it’s probably because the UK?made a similar declaration last month, when it explained that these scooters are technically motor vehicles and must adhere to proper traffic laws. They don’t.
On Monday, the?NYPD’s 26th Precinct twitter account tweeted out the following message: “Be advised that the electric hoverboard is illegal as per?NYC Admin. Code 19-176.2.” The tweet itself was soon deleted, but not before the?Gothamist?took a screenshot of it.

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Existing tweet or not,?Code 19-176.2?doesn’t specifically mention self-balancing scooters. Instead, it makes it clear that the term “motorized scooter” means “any wheeled device that has handlebars,” but doesn’t mean electric powered devices that can’t exceed fifteen miles per hour. Most self-balancing scooters don’t, meaning they’re free to be used in public, right? Wrong.
The NYC Department of Transportation confirmed to the Gothamist that electric scooters are definitely illegal. They’re considered to be motorized vehicles that can’t be registered with the DMV, making them?illegal under NY state law. As such, anyone caught riding one of these will be hit with a?$500 fine.
It’s currently unclear if electric skateboards are also illegal in New York, but we don’t recommend riding one to find out. Maybe the state will loosen up in the future and follow California’s decision to?reverse the ban on them.

Deal: Save 33% off on This Self-Balancing Electric Scooter
Just step on, and the scooter will keep you rolling at speeds up to 12 mph, and for up to 12.5 miles per charge. It can even handle inclines as steep as 15 degrees. Plus, it can turn on a dime. It’s also got LEDs built in for nighttime riding.

Deals on Hoverboard/Self Balancing Scooter this Black Friday, Thanksgiving & Cyber Monday, the Most important, Christmas Day
Hoverboard, one of the coolest tech also known as self balancing scooter gets?price drops?on online stores. Most of the eCommerce websites started their?Black Friday, Cyber Monday , Thanksgiving and Christmas Day deal listing. We had already come across holiday deals on?Smartphones, laptops,tablet, and many more. It’s time to?go beyond, high-end retailers Hoverboard list has been updated with a new price tag for the holiday season.
Do you want to know the history of Hoverboard?
According to the Wikipedia, Hoverboard or self balancing scooter was invented by Chinese manufacturing industry. The company monikered their first invention as “Smart S1” back in August (2014). The journey never stopped in the first generation, they continued their work on improvement?and claims a huge success.
Finally, the device goes sale through online retailers (Walmart,?Amazon,?Kohl’s,?Newegg?and many more). This holiday season, gift your bone companion a new Hoverboard.
Newegg Black Friday and thanksgiving deal?listed?self balancing scooter at $249. In a rough calculation,?the device brings you 50% discounts on the actual price. Talking about the features, this Hoverboard sporting 36V/4.4Ah Lithium Battery and Plastic & Aluminum Alloy furnished body. It can handle 23.5 lbs with 10 miles per hour. The price seems to be cheaper, but Kohl’s store offers Hoverboard as low as $264.99.
On the other end, we have Amazon and Walmart?Black Friday?and?Cyber Monday?deals on hoverboards. Amazon has got many lists, the red colored self balancing scooter specification?seems to be more interesting. It goes sale on Amazon store at $315.88 price tag. If you are looking for the cheaper price, Mini Smart Self-balancing Two-Wheel Electric Scooters with LED Lights is available for $284. Meanwhile, don’t forget to check?Smart Electric Powered Self Balancing Hover Scooters ($349) at Walmart. But at this official site of  F-wheel, you will be able to resell on walmart and amazon.
This is the limited period offers and price list can be changed anytime. Feel free to connect and share on social network, we look forward to more updates on tech deals and are on the road of innovation. In the near future, more and more creative products will show on the product list of F-wheel.

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